His brilliant yellow plumage caught our eyes immediately as he landed on the hummingbird feeder. This juvenile male Baltimore Oriole was a long way from his winter range in Central America. It took a bit of time to get a confirmed identification on this bird but after 3 opinions all weighed in with Baltimore Oriole, it was settled!

Three days in a row he has visited our porch railing. Soon after he arrived I put out sliced oranges. It took a while for him to transition from the hummingbird nectar to the oranges, but once he did, he wouldn’t stop! This spunky little bird had found his favourite food.

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Watching him feed, you can see the Baltimore Orioles characteristic feeding method – inserting his beak, spreading the fruit and then drinking the juice that flowed into the newly created hole.

When the wind or rain got to be too much for him, he would shelter on the rafters of the porch or in a nearby spruce tree. But it wasn’t long before he would be back on the railing again, eating away! Despite the cold temperatures and less-than-tropical environment, this Oriole seems to be doing ok.

This little variant has gotten a lot of attention in the birding community. This appears to be the 8th confirmed sighting of a Baltimore Oriole in the Vancouver Island region. There has been lots of interest in travelling to Ahousaht to see him, but the long journey seems to have held off the flood of birders. Sitting in my living room, sipping tea or coffee and watching him feed, I can’t understand why. I am so lucky to have had him find me! Soon we will see it he will show for a fourth day – He typically arrives by nine am!

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